Home cured ham: how to brine a ham

Home cured ham: how to brine a ham
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One of the great things about raising your own pigs is having a full freezer after hog butchering is done. And while we all love homemade bacon, ham is a favorite as well. So let me share with you how we brine a ham (and then smoke it!) here at our farm.

(Don’t want to read all the words? This blog post is also a podcast—just press the triangle play button on the little black bar at the top of this post!)

While most people think of ham as a giant cut from the back end of a pig, you can actually make ham from any pork roast that you cut. At butcher time, we always cut several smaller pork roasts instead of two giant hams from each pig. We do this because packaging is easier, and it also allows us more flexibility in what we do with the pork roasts.

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

After choosing a pork roast (or several!) to make into ham, the first thing you need to do is brine the ham. Some people call this “curing” a ham — brining is a type of curing. To brine a ham is basically to wet cure a ham.

Brining takes several days, and it’s essential to the process of making a good ham. Please realize that making a ham from the pigs you have raised is not going to be an immediate thing — it’s definitely a process. Good things come to those who wait.

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

 

How to brine a ham

Here’s the method we use to brine a ham. For every 7 pounds of pork you’re using, you will need:

2 1/4 cups kosher salt

2 cups brown sugar

2 1/2 tablespoons pink curing salt <– needs to be this, not table salt

1 tablespoon pickling spice

1/4 cup molasses

6 qts of water, divided

Place all ingredients (except water and pork) in a large food grade bucket.

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

Bring two quarts of water to a boil and then pour over what’s in the bucket. Stir to dissolve. Then pour four quarts of cold water into the bucket. Stir until well combined. Then carefully place your pork roast(s) in the brine filled bucket.

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

(Remember if you’re using more than 7 pounds of pork, you’ll need to adjust everything in this recipe accordingly — including the water. Which means you need to make sure you have a big enough bucket to hold everything!)

It is very important to remember that when you brine a ham and while this brine is working its magic on the pork roast, the pork roast needs to stay completely submerged. You can do this by turning a dinner plate upside down and putting it on top of the pork roast. For extra insurance, we usually fill a Ziploc bag with water and place it on top of the plate to make sure the pork roast doesn’t come poking out of the brine.

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

Some people suggest turning or flipping the roast in the brine solution every day or so, but we’ve never done this.

The pork roast needs to brine one day for every two pounds of pork. In other words, a seven pound roast would need to brine at least two and a half days. This bucket of future ham needs to be refrigerated for the entire brine time. Plan accordingly!

After brine time is done…

When the brining time is completed, you need to rinse the roast(s). Some folks rinse it in cold water for several minutes, other folks put the roasts back into a clean bucket with fresh water and let it sit overnight.

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

It all depends how salty you like your ham. The quicker you rinse, the saltier the ham will be. (We rinse ours for about five minutes – we like salty ham!)

After the ham has been rinsed to your liking, blot the ham dry. We actually set ours up to dry in the kitchen on drying racks with a fan. The drier the skin of your ham is, the more the smoke flavor will adhere in the next step.

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

The next step after you brine a ham? Smoke the ham.

We have an electric smoker (only because we don’t yet have a smokehouse) and so when our hams are ready to be smoked we put them in the smoker, turn it on, fill the tray with wood chips, and let ‘er go.

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

Know this: it sometimes takes a lot longer to smoke your hams because the temperature outside is well below zero and it takes that smoker a little more work to keep up to temp. This particular 14 pounds of ham smoked for several hours to reach an internal temperature of 150-160 degrees.

Even so, it was well worth the wait.

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

Can you “smoke” a ham if you don’t have a smoker?

You can! On a handwritten recipe card in my recipe box, I have the instructions that after you brine a ham, it should be dried, brushed with liquid smoke, and then baked at 325 for 30 minutes per pound, or until the internal temp of the ham reaches 150 degrees F. We don’t use this recipe now because we have a smoker, but it’s good to know the option is there.

There are also several articles on the Google that explain how to smoke a ham (or any meat) without a smoker—some of them are simple, others more involved. Try your luck with the Google and see what you come up with.

Or, you know, invest in a smoker.

Homegrown, home-cured ham is the best!

There’s nothing like sitting down to a plate of eggs from the coop, toast made from homemade bread, and a slab of ham from pigs that you raised yourself. It’s the best kind of meal, don’t you think?

Interested in learning how to turn your pork into ham? Let me share with you how we brine a ham (or wet-cure a ham) here at our farm.

Yum, you guys. YUM.

Brine (wet-cure) for fresh ham

Have fresh pork you'd like to turn into ham? Here's how to make it happen!

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups kosher salt
  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • 2 1/2 Tbsp. pink curing salt
  • 1 Tbsp pickling spice
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 6 quarts water (divided)
  • 7 pounds pork roast (adjust recipe if using more pork)

Instructions

1. Place salts, sugars, spices, and molasses in large food grade bucket.

2. Bring TWO quarts of the water to a boil and then pour over the dry ingredients in the bucket. Stir to dissolve.

3. Then pour FOUR quarts of cold water into the bucket. Stir until well combined.

4. Carefully place your pork roast(s) in the brine filled bucket. Turn a plate upside down and place on top of pork roasts to keep them completely submerged.

5. The pork needs to brine ONE day for every TWO pounds of pork. (7 lbs of pork = 2.5 days) and needs to be refrigerated that entire time.

6. When brining is completed, you need to rinse the roast(s). You can rinse the pork in cold water for several minutes (saltier ham). Or put pork back into a clean bucket with fresh water and let it sit overnight (less salty ham).

7. Blot ham dry, or dry on racks with a fan.

8. Smoke (electric smoker or smokehouse) until internal recipe reaches 150-160.

9. Don’t have a smoker? The ham should be blotted dry, brushed with liquid smoke, and then baked at 325 for 30 minutes per pound, or until the internal temp of the ham reaches 150 degrees F.

Subscribe to my Farmish Kind of Life podcast at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, PlayerFM, or other popular podcast players. All episodes of the podcast will also be linked under the podcast tab that you can find way at the top of this post in my menu bar.

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